The Three Hardest Words: “I Made This”

dish“I made this”, is what we say by implication when we publish, send, launch, perform or unveil work that is entirely our own. Three wonderful, difficult and daunting words.

We are the only ones who can choose when — or whether — to say them, whether to hit “publish”… whether to take the risk.

Solo entrepreneurs, writers, bloggers, artists, performers, artisans all know the feeling. But even in a team at a small startup, we may feel this to some degree because we may singlehandedly represent some entire aspect of a company, a product or a service.

Our work represents us. Once we unveil it, it is out there and usually can’t be retracted. There is no-one else to stand behind it, to share the blame or the praise. No large corporation to take the flack. No anonymity. It’s like publishing a condensed version of ourselves; a snapshot of what we are currently capable of, warts and all, for the world to see.

It takes nerve to accept feedback – good, bad and indifferent – and still stand by our work, to discuss potential improvements to it, or the inevitable choices we could have made. There is no perfect launch and nothing is ever truly “ready”.

The crucial thing is realising we did our best at the time, that no-one is 100% correct, and still being glad that we put it out there. It takes guts to realise we will inevitably want to retract, delete, smash it to pieces, or to endlessly correct it based on feedback — or the perceived feedback of indifference — but to keep it out there anyway, in its original form.

So far, I’ve done this with two software products I developed alone, this blog, photographs and other articles. I have friends who have done it with startups, artwork, experimental new food products, books and performance art. I’m proud to count myself among them because I think people who have done this are amazing.

I’m convinced that we learn more by putting our work in front of an audience than we possibly ever could by thinking and agonising about it in private, by tweaking it and waiting until we feel like it is somehow worthy or “ready”. Those lessons feed back into our next attempts, but only if we make our first attempts.

If you’re in doubt, it’s probably ready. So take the leap, and say “I made this”.