Integration-Driven Development

It’s a familiar stereotype: The lone software nerd. Working in isolation. Rarely interacting with anyone.

In reality, this particular stereotype couldn’t be further from the truth. Everything we work on as software developers integrates with something or someone else.

cogsIt might be behind the scenes by providing or using an API, or by communicating with another module, an external system or a database. Or if we’re building a User Interface, that’s a visual integration with another person’s expectations and mental model of a task they want to perform. Granted, it’s much more creative and fluid than the ones mentioned earlier, but it’s an integration with another party nevertheless.

Nothing we develop exists in isolation: Integrations and interactions are crucial, and this usually means working with other people, either as end users or as the creators of the systems we need to integrate with. So much for that loner stereotype.

But we’re also human…

When we begin a development task, there’s a natural tendency to go depth-first and to work on a piece as we understand it at first. We like to work on the bit we feel in control of, and to feel “ready” before we expose it to others.

As it turns out, instead of this seemingly productive focus leading to our “best” work, once revealed, it can often be detrimental, both for us and for the project. Why…?

  • We’re making assumptions about the integration and interactions that are inevitably needed and, by not validating them, risking the need for re-work.
  • We’re delaying exposing our work to others at which point their own assumptions can be tested, risking re-work on their part.

The answer, contrary to our natural inclinations, seems to be to begin integrating and exposing our work as early as possible.

How to integrate early?

For non-visual work, we can actually build the integration, the API, the interface with the other module or system, as early as possible. This may involve a certain amount of mocking up and simulation to get it working, perhaps using fake data, but we can do this quickly and cheaply as those parts will be thrown away towards the end.

One crucial thing to remember… is to actually throw those mocks away and not to accidentally leave any behind. It’s a common mistake to go live with mock code remaining, so it’s best to mark it in some way or to use obviously fake data so as to be embarrassingly obvious.

For visual work, a lower-quality version with just the interactions working is a good starting point; a form of living wireframes, minimally demonstrable. Something people can play with before any visual polish is added.

There are undeniable challenges I’m ignoring here, as the incremental development from living wireframes to pixel-perfect renderings of designs can be a difficult transition that ignores fundamental differences between the two. Design work often leads to an internal restructuring of visual implementations. That said, these are problems worth tackling, as exposing something people can interact with early potentially prevents much rework anyway.

Validating assumptions about the complex and nuanced interaction with human beings is best done as early as possible.

Visual work also needs to integrate with and test assumptions about the data and other non-visual interactions upon which it will rely, if only informally, as mistakes here can also lead to rework.

What improves?

If we can convince ourselves to integrate early, and on an ongoing basis…

  • We expose our work earlier to others. It’s not only helpful but healthy. Perhaps time to get over our natural tendencies to perfect then reveal.
  • We often learn something unexpected that shapes how we build the bit we’re working on, and so avoids rework.
  • Expectations and assumptions can be tested; both ours and those of others.
  • A basic working version of the overall system is achievable earlier, whereby end-to-end assumptions can be tested, perhaps with stakeholders, and problems spotted.
  • Avoids the last-minute integration and “Oh, s***!” moments that so often lead to project delays.

What are the challenges?

Just like integration, change is inevitable.

Doesn’t this mean we should integrate later, once we “know everything”? Don’t early integrations just set us up for rework when change occurs?

I’d argue that early integration means we know who else is affected, and how, so we can swiftly make the change and fix the integration, rather than storing up the change for disclosure during late integration. It’s better to absorb the impact of the change early, including any knock-on effect. Learning can take place sooner and in all the places it is needed.

Due to earlier coupling, we do however need to be mindful of timings and upfront about the impact on other people, rather than just “breaking” integrations and waiting for others to discover them. Checking others are ready to absorb the change minimises disruption and provides a valuable way to communicate the change. We need to move sympathetically with the needs others.

Rather than looking on early integrations as inevitable victims of change, they are also a valuable source of it. Without early integration, we may be delaying discovering the need for the change and storing up the disruption for later.

 

If we do it early and on an ongoing basis, this breadth-first early approach to integration not only avoids late discovery of problems and minimises the need for re-work… it also makes software development quite an interactive activity.

So much for the loner stereotype!

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